Former France, PSG defender dies four decades after slipping into coma

The Age

By Julian Pretot

September,7 2021

Paris: Former France defender Jean-Pierre Adams has died at the age of 73, almost 40 years after falling into a coma following a medical error, his former clubs, Paris Saint-Germain and Nimes, said on Monday.

In 1982, Adams was administered a near-fatal dose of anaesthetic ahead of a routine knee operation, which caused brain damage.

Jean-Pierre Adams (left) during an international friendly between France and Portugal.

The Dakar-born Adams had won 22 caps for Les Bleus in the 1970s, forming with Marius Tresor what was known as ‘the Black Guard’.

Ligue 1 giants PSG issued a statement offering ‘heartfelt condolences to his family and loved ones’, adding that Adams’ “love of life, charisma and experience quickly brought respect” at the club.

 He played for Nimes from 1970-73 and for PSG from 1977-79 after joining from Nice. Nimes and PSG took part in a jubilee for Adams in 1984, two years before the Parisians won the first of their nine domestic titles.

Since the accident, Adams has been cared for by his wife, Bernadette.

Meanwhile, Brazilian legend Pele has had an apparent tumour on the right side of his colon removed in an operation.

Albert Einstein Hospital in Sao Paulo said on Monday the 80-year-old soccer great is in an intensive care unit and will be transferred to a regular room on Tuesday.

The operation was a “great victory,” Pele said on his social media channels on Monday.

He went to the hospital for routine exams last week when the tumour was found. The hospital said in a statement the tumour was identified during routine cardiovascular and laboratory exams. It added it collected samples to be analysed for pathologies.

“I thank God for feeling very well and for allowing Dr Fabio and Dr Miguel to take care of my health,” Pele said. “Last Saturday I underwent surgery to remove a suspicious lesion in the right colon. The tumour was identified during the tests I mentioned last week.

Pele said his surgery had been a “great victory”.

Pele said his surgery had been a “great victory”.CREDIT:AP

“Fortunately, I’m used to celebrating great victories alongside you. I will face this match with a smile on my face, a lot of optimism and joy for living surrounded by the love of my family and friends.”

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, globally known as Pele, was hospitalised last Tuesday. He used his social media channels to deny he was in poor health.

“Guys, I didn’t faint and I’m in very good health. I went for my routine exams, which I had not been able to do before because of the pandemic. Let them know I don’t play next Sunday,” he joked in the tweet.

Pele, the only male player to win three World Cups, has had mobility problems since a failed hip replacement surgery in 2012. He has been forced to use walkers and wheelchairs in public. He has also been admitted to hospitals in recent years for kidney and prostate procedures.

Pele won the 1958, 1962 and 1970 World Cups, and remains Brazil’s all-time leading scorer with 77.

AP



Family of woman killed in cage fight express ‘mismatch’ concerns

Winchester inquest hears claims that opponent was bigger and stronger than Saeideh Aletaha

The Guardian

Steven Morris

Tue 7 Sep 2021

The family of a mixed martial arts enthusiast who died after a blow to the head in a cage fight have expressed concern that she was “mismatched” with an opponent bigger and more muscular than her.

Saeideh Aletaha, a 26-year-old graduate, collapsed in a bathroom at the Central Hall in Southampton after a knockout in the third round of the contest.

At an inquest in Winchester, her family claimed her opponent, personal trainer Janie Morgan, 34, seemed bigger and stronger than Aletaha.

They claimed Aletaha seemed concerned about her opponent and stressed by the prospect of the contest. In a statement read out during the inquest, Aletaha’s family said: “Saeideh always used to send her picture with her opponent before each match. However, for her last match she had cut the picture of her opponent and sent only her own pictur

 


 Shaken baby syndrome on trial: Judges to re-examine homicide conviction 

The Age

By Chris Vedelago 

Republished 5/9/2021

 Victoria’s highest court has flagged serious concerns about the scientific diagnosis known as “shaken baby syndrome”, which has been used to prosecute and jail a number of young men for child homicide and abuse in recent years. 

The Court of Appeal has ordered a hearing into the reliability of the 50-year-old forensic theory as part of an appeal by Jesse Vinaccia, 28, who was jailed in 2019 for killing his girlfriend’s 3½- month-old son. 

 Joby Rowe, Jesse Vinaccia and Jesse Harvey have launched appeals that will test the science underpinning shaken baby syndrome.

The outcome could have major repercussions nationwide for past convictions for childhomicide and assault — as well as child protection proceedings — where experts have relied onthe diagnosis as a basis for prosecutions or other action.

The Age is aware of at least two ongoing criminal prosecutions in Victoria that are now likely tobe delayed until the Court of Appeal makes a ruling that might ultimately affect the outcome ofthose cases.

At the centre of the controversy are findings by some forensic experts that an infant must havedied as a result of violent shaking if an autopsy reveals a “triad” of internal head injuries –bleeding in the brain, retinal haemorrhage and swelling of the brain – even where there are noexternal injuries such as bruises, cuts or broken bones or a known history of abuse.

Other scientists say the same symptoms of the triad can be a result of non-violent medicalcauses, including complications of otherwise silent birth-related head injuries, geneticconditions, infections and bleeding disorders.

The “triad-only” diagnosis has become controversial internationally but remains widelyaccepted by Australian law enforcement, forensic specialists and child-abuse experts.

The issue also raises broader questions about the way scientific evidence is used in courts, withformer prosecutors, judges and legal experts saying they are concerned that the use of disputedor untested forensic and medical opinions risks causing miscarriages of justice because of theway juries understand scientific evidence.

In 2020, Vinaccia became the first person to file an appeal challenging his shaken babysyndrome conviction, in part, on the basis the science is fundamentally flawed. Vinaccia hadbeen found guilty of killing his girlfriend’s son, Kaleb, following forensic testimony the babyshowed clear signs it had been shaken, even though experts were unable to substantiate exactlyhow the abuse occurred.

The prosecution also relied on statements from Vinaccia that he might have put Kaleb into hiscot “pretty rough” and his treatment could have been “a bit bouncy and stuff” as evidence hehad shaken the boy. There were no physical signs of abuse apart from the presence of the triad.21/08/2021 Shaken baby syndrome on trial: Judges to re-examine homicide conviction. 

 Vinaccia’s appeal claims the confession was unreliable, the conviction was unsupported bymedical evidence confirming shaking was the cause of the fatal injuries, and that police andexperts failed to consider that the injuries could be accounted for by Kaleb’s pre-existingmedical condition, which had previously led to him being hospitalised with swelling in hisbrain.

During an earlier hearing, before the court granted the appeal, Justice Chris Maxwell said thatfor the Vinaccia case, the “real field of battle is the forensic evidence field” and there was apotential “public interest question” that could be answered about the reliability of the shakenbaby theory.

“Is this something that the Court of Appeal will have to wrestle with sooner or later, or shouldwrestle with in the interests of the integrity of the criminal justice system or public confidencein it, or some combination of those things?” Justice Maxwell asked in June.

The green light for the appeal comes after The Age revealed earlier this year that two ofVictoria’s top forensic scientists held serious concerns about the reliability of the shaken babydiagnosis and its use in criminal proceedings.

The Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine’s director, Professor David Ranson, and the headof the forensic pathology department, Dr Linda Iles, warned that “triad-only” cases were riskybecause the evidence of abuse was only “indirect” and therefore weak.

“That reliance on a single piece of evidence is always dangerous. Whether you like the triadissues or don’t like the triad issues, it’s not the be-all and the end-all. It behoves the entirelegal system to say giving weight and relying solely on a single piece of evidence is incrediblydangerous,” Professor Ranson told The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald in May.

Dr Iles is one of the experts called by the prosecution to testify at Vinaccia’s trial who will nowbe re-called as part of the Court of Appeal’s review of the evidence.21/08/2021 Shaken baby syndrome on trial: Judges to re-examine homicide. 

 Another is Dr Jo Tully, the deputy director of the Victorian Forensic Paediatric Medical Serviceat the Royal Children’s and Monash Children’s hospitals, whose evidence has been central tomany prosecutions for shaken baby syndrome and child protection actions. She has previouslycharacterised criticism of the evidence for shaken baby syndrome as coming from “non-believers”.

The Court of Appeal also heard that two other appeals against convictions for child homicideand assault have been filed by the same lawyers representing Vinaccia.

Joby Rowe was found guilty of child homicide in 2018 over the death of his three-month-olddaughter, Alanah. “Violent shaking with or without impact on a soft surface” was found to bethe cause of death based on her internal injuries, with experts testifying there was no other“reasonable explanation”. Rowe denied mistreating the child.

Jesse Harvey was convicted of recklessly causing serious injury to his seven-week-old son,Casey, in 2019. He claimed he did not shake or hit Casey, but said the baby bumped his head onthe edge of a couch as Harvey sat down. The medical evidence held the child’s internal injurieswere equivalent to a 10-metre fall or high-velocity motor vehicle collision.

 Support is available from the National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family ViolenceCounselling Service at 1800RESPECT (1800 737 732).



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