Rugby players’ brains affected in single season, study suggests

The Guardian
Lucy Campbell
1/9/2010 

A single season of professional rugby could be enough to cause a decline in a player’s blood flow to the brain and cognitive function, according to a study.

The research, reported by the BBC, also suggests that repetitive contact events, rather than only concussions, incurred through rugby caused the declines seen in the players.

Researchers from the University of South Wales followed a professional team playing in the United Rugby Championship over the course of a season, testing the players pre-season, mid-season and post-season.

The peer-reviewed study, which will be published on Wednesday in the Journal of Experimental Physiology, found that over the season the squad experienced reduced blood flow to the brain and cognitive function – the ability to reason, remember, formulate ideas and perform mental gymnastics.

University of South Wales research finds professional squad suffered decline in cognitive function

A single season of professional rugby could be enough to cause a decline in a player’s blood flow to the brain and cognitive function, according to a study.

The research, reported by the BBC, also suggests that repetitive contact events, rather than only concussions, incurred through rugby caused the declines seen in the players.

Researchers from the University of South Wales followed a professional team playing in the United Rugby Championship over the course of a season, testing the players pre-season, mid-season and post-season.

The peer-reviewed study, which will be published on Wednesday in the Journal of Experimental Physiology, found that over the season the squad experienced reduced blood flow to the brain and cognitive function – the ability to reason, remember, formulate ideas and perform mental gymnastics.

 


Murder charges laid after boy, 16, dies following alleged bashing

 The Sydney Morning Herald

By Carrie Fellner

August 7, 2021 — 3.48pm

Five teenagers have been charged with murder after a 16-year-old boy died in a western Sydney hospital on Saturday.

The boy was found unconscious, with head and chest injuries, after he was allegedly assaulted by the group at a home on Perigee Close in Doonside on Wednesday evening.

The boy was taken to Westmead Hospital in a critical condition but succumbed to his injuries on Saturday morning.

Police established Strike Force Brens to investigate and charged two boys - aged 13 and 15 - and a girl, 15, in the hours after the alleged bashing.

A further two boys - aged 13 and 14 - were arrested at Ermington on Thursday afternoon following further inquiries.

All five teenagers have now been charged with murder, along with causing grievous bodily harm to a person with intent and detaining in company with intent to get advantage occasioning actual bodily harm.

They have appeared in children’s court and were formally refused bail to reappear on Friday, August 13.

Investigations are continuing.



Critique of baby shaking prosecutions raises troubling response

The Age

Greg Barns

Barrister

May 25, 2021

The response of Victorian forensic scientists to a critique of their methods in assessing socalled baby shaking cases shows that there is some disagreement among those in this field.

Perhaps this ought to be the trigger for a much-needed independent inquiry and review of the use of forensic science and evidence in the criminal justice system. The decision of attorneys-general across Australia to abandon such a review, commissioned in 2019, should be reversed immediately.

As The Age has revealed, an article by Dr Chris Brook, published in 2019 in the Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, took issue with a 2018 conviction of Joby Rowe, who was jailed for nine years for the homicide of his three-month-old daughter. The case involved the evidence of forensic pathologist Dr Linda Iles and forensic paediatrician Dr Jo Tully.

Their evidence was based on a “triad” of internal head injuries – bleeding in the brain, retinal haemorrhage and swelling of the brain – as the cause of death.

As The Age reported, “the diagnosis that ‘triad-only’ injuries are caused by the violent shaking of a baby is now hotly contested globally. Proponents claim the triad is conclusive of abuse, while detractors say faulty science means such convictions are unsound.” Dr Brook is one of those critics . After correspondence,the article was pulled from the Journal website. Whether Drs Tully and Iles on the one hand and Dr Brook on the other are correct, or if both have valid points, is a matter that seems unresolved. But then it is not unusual in science to have disagreements between professionals over such issues as methods and theories.

The concerns about forensic evidence and science in the criminal justice system is, however, not new.

There have been with rumblings of doubt in the medical and legal world, including judicial comment, in recent years.

The response by a senior Victorian prosecutor, Ray Gibson QC, to this controversy over the methodologies and theories in so-called shaken baby cases fails to grapple with the essence of the issue. According to Mr Gibson when an expert witness “gives an opinion, they are subject to cross-examination. It’s open to scrutiny, it’s open to be contradicted by another expert giving a contrary opinion. If we as the prosecution can’t exclude that then the prosecution fails.”

Dr Chris Brook, astrophysicist and critic of shaken baby syndrome.

This reminder breezes over the issue of the president of Victoria’s Court of Appeal, Chris Maxwell, has identified as the “scientific illiteracy” of those who participate in a trial. Justice Maxwell has for some years expressed his concern about “the problem of unreliable science and wrongful convictions” and their effect on the criminal justice system.

In his 2017 paper, Preventing Miscarriages of Justice: the Reliability of Forensic Evidence and the Role of the Trial Judge as Gatekeeper, he notes that the responsibility for ensuing the reliability of evidence.

In July 2019 a ground-breaking and disturbing analysis by a researcher at the University of Sydney led by Dr Jason Chin, a law and psychology lecturer, found after examining 30 forensic science journals that “these journals aren’t requiring authors to conduct their research transparently, such as by posting their data online for others to scrutinise.

These are the closed practices that in other fields contributed to studies showing medicines worked  Forensic science practices and methodologies, like all forms of science, need regular reviewing.

That is not to say Dr Iles and Dr Tully were wrong, and Dr Brook right, it is just that if there is real disagreement about something so critical as forensic evidence in the criminal justice process Victoria’s Attorney-General Jaclyn Symes should go it alone on such a review if her counterparts across the nation refuse to allow the national review they commissioned two years ago to begin its work.

At the very least, surely there should be a pause in current prosecutions in cases where a person is charged in relation to the death of a child and where the state relies on hotly contested methods and theories such as “triad” evidence so that experts like Dr Iles and Dr

Tully and colleagues can take stock of the state of the science.

Greg Barns SC is a barrister and National Criminal Justice Spokesman for the Australian Lawyers Alliance.



  1. Decoding 'the Most Complex Object in the Universe'
  2. Jockey Lorna Brooke dies after fall at Taunton racecourse early in April
  3. Man dies after freak accident at Portarlington Golf Club
  4. AFL brain disease cases ‘tip of the iceberg’: US expert
  5. Bill for veterans' mental health care reaches $241m with 20,000 in rehab
  6. Jail for father who continued gaming after fatally injuring baby son
  7. VA unlawfully turned away vulnerable veterans for decades, study says, with 400,000 more at risk
  8. Brain Injuries Are Common in Battle. The Military Has No Reliable Test for Them.
  9. Fifty US troops left with brain injuries after Iranian rocket attack
  10. This Helmet Will Save Football. Actually, Probably Not.
  11. British man found guilty of Australian Amy Parsons' murder in London
  12. My once-vibrant husband died of ALS, and my complicated grief is deep
  13. Program to Prevent Suicide by Veterans Earns Bipartisan Support
  14. Sporty teens with concussions are three times more likely to be depressed
  15. Just one season of playing football—even without a concussion—can cause brain damage
  16. Startups fighting a 'bulletproof' mentality in men's health
  17. 'His personality changed': Michael Hutchence's sister on his traumatic brain injury
  18. Toddler suffers 'catastrophic brain injury' in alleged beating
  19. Cyclist, 70, left with head and spinal injuries after being hit by car
  20. 'Choked to the point of brain damage': Ice scourge fuels domestic violence
  21. Mass Murderer Possible undiagnosed brain damage
  22. Savage attack in Melbourne's north leaves tourist with bleeding to the brain, broken jaw
  23. Link between concussion and brain damage to ensure AFL debate rages
  24. Sports commentator Billy J Smith dies after a fall
  25. Surgeon killer could be first to get10-year term under one-punch laws
  26. Liam Neeson's nephew Ronan Sexton dies, years after serious fall
  27. Toddler burnt with lighter and hit every day in lead-up to her death, court told
  28. Patron filmed unconscious, held around neck as guard evicts him from hotel
  29. FA Cup set to introduce concussion substitute trial this season
  30. Teen fighting for life after Healesville car park brawl
  31. Police discover critically injured man at Logan Village address
  32. 'Don't ask me for compassion': Angry Anderson has not forgiven his son's killer
  33. Brain Injuries Remain Undiagnosed in Thousands of Soldiers
  34. Man dies in hospital after falling to punch in Fortitude Valley
  35. Maradona to be discharged within days, says doctor
  36. Cricket bat bashing victim fights for life after Ballajura pub brawl
  37. Diego Maradona, World Cup-winning football superstar, set to undergo brain surgery
  38. 'Country footy is way behind': The missing concussion discussion in local level Aussie Rules
  39. Autistic girls going undiagnosed due to ‘camouflaging’ behaviour, study says
  40. Lisa Montgomery to be first female federal inmate executed in 67 years
  41. Man dies after being shoved to the ground in New York mask altercatio
  42. Thomas had a rare brain cancer and no good options. Then he joined a clinical trial
  43. Nearly One-Third of Covid Patients in Study Had Altered Mental State
  44. Shaun Smith supportive of daughter Amy, signed by AFLW club North Melbourne
  45. Texas residents warned of tap water tainted with brain-eating microbe
  46. 'It's been a big day for me': Smith wants change after $1.4m concussion payout
  47. Damage Assessment
  48. What are CTE and concussion and how do they affect athletes?
  49. Danny Frawley was suffering from chronic brain disease when he died
  50. Elon Musk unveils brain computer implanted in pigs
  51. Portland truck driver apparently kicked unconscious as unrest continues
  52. Treatment for aggressive brain cancer shows promise in early trial
  53. Four-year-old injured after motorbike crashes through barriers at Sydney race
  54. 'Dangerous behaviour': Horror crash in sprint to finish leaves rider fighting for life
  55. Father charged with murder over death of six-month-old baby Beau
  56. Sickening Michael Chee Kam concussion overshadows gritty Eels win
  57. We asked veterans to respond to The Post’s reporting on Clint Lorance and his platoon. Here’s what they said.
  58. Doctors find brain issues linked to Covid-19 patients – study
  59. Widow of heart surgeon killed in one-punch attack sues Melbourne hospital
  60. Crowdfunding raises £30,000 for veteran's brain tumour surgery
  61. Boy in critical condition after fall at Sydney primary school
  62. 'I began to wonder if I would be better off ending my life': The invisible war wounds
  63. VA unlawfully turned away vulnerable veterans for decades, study says, with 400,000 more at risk
  64. Brain wiring could be behind learning difficulties, say experts
  65. Concussion: there's no knockout answer
  66. CTE discovered in Polly Farmer's brain in AFL-first
  67. Six-week-old baby nearly killed in ice-fuelled attack, court told
  68. Former hard man Ron Gibbs' chilling admission as head knocks take toll
  69. An Olympic Hockey Hero, a Violent Crime and the Specter of Brain Trauma
  70. Traumatic brain injury is a signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But the military still has no objective way of diagnosing it in the field.
  71. More than 100 US troops suffered traumatic brain suffered traumatic brain in Iran strike,to report
  72. Man, 28, fighting for life nearly two weeks after Southbank attack
  73. NRL pledges initial $250,000 for landmark concussion study
  74. Veterans criticize Trump's downplaying of US troops' brain injuries
  75. Trump should apologize for minimizing troops’ injuries, VFW says.
  76. Fifty US troops left with brain injuries after Iranian rocket attack
  77. Can heading a football lead to dementia? The evidence is growing
  78. Mobile phones cause tumours, Italian court rules, in defiance of evidence
  79. Scientists create decoder to turn brain activity into speech
  80. Woman reportedly wakes up from coma after 27 years
  81. Enraged Qld dad who killed toddler jailed
  82. 'We thought it would be wonderful - we didn't know what was to come'
  83. 'We thought it would be wonderful - we didn't know what was to come'
  84. Graham must wake up to dangers of concussion
  85. Footballers focus on concussion, but there are many other risk factors
  86. Ex-AFL player sues club after retiring because of concussion
  87. When will we stop butting heads over sporting concussion?
  88. Why people with brain implants are afraid of automatic doors
  89. Christchurch mosque shooting victim, 4, suffering brain damage
  90. Link between concussion and brain damage to ensure AFL debate rages

Page 2 of 32

Latest News

  • Former France, PSG defender dies four decades after slipping into coma
    Former France, PSG defender dies four decades after slipping into coma The Age By Julian Pretot September,7 2021 Paris: Former France defender...
  • Family of woman killed in cage fight express ‘mismatch’ concerns
    Family of woman killed in cage fight express ‘mismatch’ concerns Winchester inquest hears claims that opponent was bigger and stronger than Saeideh...
  • Shaken baby syndrome on trial: Judges to reexamine homicide conviction
     Shaken baby syndrome on trial: Judges to re-examine homicide conviction  The Age By Chris Vedelago  Republished 5/9/2021  Victoria’s highest court has flagged...
  • Rugby players’ brains affected in single season, study suggests
    Rugby players’ brains affected in single season, study suggests The Guardian Lucy Campbell 1/9/2010  A single season of professional rugby could be...
  • Murder charges laid after boy, 16, dies following alleged bashing
    Murder charges laid after boy, 16, dies following alleged bashing  The Sydney Morning Herald By Carrie Fellner August 7, 2021 — 3.48pm Five teenagers have...
  • Critique of baby shaking prosecutions raises troubling response
    Critique of baby shaking prosecutions raises troubling response The Age Greg Barns Barrister May 25, 2021 The response of Victorian forensic...